book review

Thriller review: ‘The Marriage Pact’ by Michelle Richmond

marriagepactcover

The Marriage Pact. Michelle Richmond. Penguin. July 2017.

Would you stake your life on your marriage?

Newlyweds Jake and Alice are offered a mysterious wedding gift – membership of a club which promises its couples will never divorce.

Signing The Pact seems the start to a perfect marriage.

Until one of them breaks the rules.

The marriage of their dreams is about to become their worst nightmare.

Because The Pact is for life.

And its members will do anything to make sure no one leaves . . .


Thank you to Netgalley and Penguin for providing me with a digital copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

The Marriage Pact is hands down the best thriller I have read this year. I very rarely give 5 stars to a thriller these days because they are often samey and predictable, but this one had such a unique concept, and it was so well executed, that it ended up really wowing me.

I’ve always been fascinated by cults, but all of the cult-related books I have read have featured closed-community type cults. I loved that The Pact was a completely different kind of cult – an organisation operating on a global scale, with seemingly unlimited funds, and extreme levels of secrecy regarding its members and its methods. The scale, influence, and sinister mystery of The Pact made it all the more terrifying.

Jake and Alice were both likeable and believable characters, and I really enjoyed the development of their relationship, particularly seeing how it fared under such pressure (the whole being terrorised by a marriage-cult thing… just your standard marital problem). Although I loved both characters, they both frustrated me at times. The Pact really got between these characters, and the danger it put them in forced them to hide things from each other. But, if only they had communicated with each other more, they’d have had so much more ammunition with which to fight back against The Pact. I just wanted to smack their heads together, and be like: ‘Talk to each other, you fooools!” That being said, the deeper the trouble Jake and Alice got themselves into, the faster I was turning those pages. I cared about them, and I could barely put this book down; I carried it with me whilst I washed, dressed, cooked, ate, and absent-mindedly participated in conversations.

The Marriage Pact is told from Jake’s point of view, and I really connected with him as a narrator, although I would have welcomed some chapters from Alice’s point of view. There are sections of this book where Alice is going through (scary, scary) things that I would have loved to have heard about from her perspective. However, I guess I can appreciate why the author has chosen not to do this; the tension is ramped up to the max when Jake is separated from Alice and has no idea what is happening to her.

What I loved most about this novel was the world-building. World-building isn’t something I would usually associate with a thriller novel, but The Pact, as a wide-reaching cult-like community, needed a lot of setting-up. I think the author did a marvellous job of making The Pact feel like an authentic ‘world’, and succeeded at weaving in details throughout the story, rather than information-dumping everything at the beginning to set the scene. Every aspect of The Pact was well-thought out, from the rules, to the rituals, to the ridiculously terrifying Pact headquarters, named Fernley. I don’t want to reveal any details about what Fernley is/is like in this review, because I don’t want to spoil anything, but I felt like this gigantic place was so well described, so intricately thought out and revealed, that it felt scarily real, like the setting of a vivid nightmare.

If you are going to read this novel, naturally you are going to require a little suspension of disbelief. One thing that perplexed me when I first started reading this novel was how readily Jake and Alice signed their lives over to The Pact. Of course, they didn’t really know what they were letting themselves in for, but that’s where my issue lies; neither of them read The Pact’s main text ‘The Manual’ before deciding whether to join. In fact, they both scribble their signatures hastily, without even bothering to have a proper look at the contract they are signing. Alice is supposed to be an attorney, so it made no sense to me that she would sign a legal document without reading it first! Anyway, I quickly decided to suspend my disbelief, and I’m glad I did, because the story that followed was so exciting, I ended up being fully appreciative of Alice’s moment of madness (even if I do still think she needs to go back to Law school!)

All in all, I loved this thriller to pieces, and I decided to give this one a full 5 stars, because it gripped me so hard I was still thinking about it hours after finishing it. Highly recommend this book, especially if you’re looking for something to devour in one sitting.

4 thoughts on “Thriller review: ‘The Marriage Pact’ by Michelle Richmond”

  1. Great review. I absolutely loved this book too. It’s just so addictive and grippy. I do think it goes a little OTT in places (mostly Fernley) but it still works. Like you I would have loved a chapter or two from another pov but it does build the tension.

    1. Ahh thank you! Glad you enjoyed this one too. 🙂 Yes Fernley requires a huge suspension of disbelief, but agreed it still works – I think the scenes are Fernley were the most tense and exciting bits 🙂 Definitely could have benefited from some Alice POV chapters though; I really wanted to know what she was thinking all the time!

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